Sen. Gillibrand unveils plan to slash skyrocketing prescription drug prices

Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand was in Syosset Friday to outline a plan to help slash skyrocketing drug prices.
The five-point plan calls for the following:
- An annual review for excessive pricing of brand-name drugs
- Empowering Medicare to negotiate lower prices
- Importing lower-cost drugs from Canada
- Expanding subsidies to low-income seniors living in the 14 U.S. territories
- Overhauling financial assistance for Medicare by streamlining programs
According to a 2021 AARP report, the average retail price for 143 widely used brand-name drugs increased more than 300% over the past 15 years.
Jacqueline Campbell, of Queens, says it's a case of sticker shock every time she pays for prescription drugs to treat her asthma.
"It's so high that you can't even buy medication if you're in certain situations," says Campbell. "Prescription drugs is like the lifesaver for all of us, and we can't even buy it."
Doctors tell News 12 that Gillibrand's plan would help make prescription drugs more affordable and accessible.
"Because if people have the medications they need and they take them properly and they understand how they take their medications, that will ultimately result in less downstream expense and better health and quality of life for all," says Dr. Onisis Stefas, a Northwell Health VP and chief pharmacy officer.
Gillibrand says she hopes her plan will receive congressional approval by July. She says 30% of adults have said that they have not taken their medicine as prescribed because it simply costs too much money.
"Because if people have the medications they need and they take them properly and they understand how they take their medications, they will ultimately result in less downstream expense and better health and quality of life for all," says Dr. Onisis Stefas, a Northwell Health VP & Chief Pharmacy Officer.
Gillebrand says she hopes her plan will receive Congressional approval by July. She says 30% of adults have said that they have not taken their medicine as prescribed because it simply costs too much money.