Parents worried as several baby formulas are recalled due to possible contamination

Pediatrician Dr. Sara Siddiqui, of NYU Langone Huntington Medical Group, says parents need to monitor their infants for signs of infections such as fatigue, fever vomiting or extreme irritability.

News 12 Staff

Feb 19, 2022, 3:30 AM

Updated 784 days ago

Share:

Three different kinds of baby formula were recalled after four infants got sick and one died.
The formulas could contain harmful bacteria and were all made at the same facility in Michigan.
Leah Lupo had to throw out the baby formula she made for her four-month-old son Joseph because the powder was recalled over possible contamination.
"It's very scary because now I'm thinking to myself, 'Have I been giving him contaminated powdered formula,'" Lupo says.
According to Abbot, the voluntary recall includes certain Similac, Alimentum and EleCare powder formulas.
The items are being pulled from shelves after the Food and Drug Administration found that four infants were infected with Cronobacter or Salmonella. One of those infants died.
Lupo says baby formula is already hard to find because of supply chain problems and the recall means several containers she has are no longer good.
"This is your method to feed your baby for the first year of life," Lupo says. "You need it. It's essential."
People can find out if their formula was affected by the recall by looking at the code on the bottom.
If the first two digits are 22 through 37 and also contain K8, SH or Z2 with an expiration date of April 2022 or later, it's not good.
Pediatrician Dr. Sara Siddiqui, of NYU Langone Huntington Medical Group, says parents need to monitor their infants for signs of infections such as fatigue, fever vomiting or extreme irritability.
She says a child's doctor can substitute their formula.
"You may not have to change the brand, but as long as you don't use the formula with those recall numbers," Siddiqui says. "It's very important."
Abbott says the recall has not affected any of its liquid formulas.
Powdered formulas made at other plants are also still OK to use.


More from News 12