Medical experts continue work to quell vaccine worries, stamp out misinformation

More than 134 million Americans have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, but President Joe Biden says hundreds are still dying from the virus every single day.

News 12 Staff

Apr 22, 2021, 10:50 AM

Updated 1,091 days ago

Share:

The White House is making a massive push to increase COVID-19 vaccinations, with plans announced this week to dole out millions to help with efforts around the country. But there are still many who are reluctant to roll up their sleeves.
More than 134 million Americans have had at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, but President Joe Biden says hundreds are still dying from the virus every single day.
Even with more than a quarter of Americans fully vaccinated, that number will need to still go up quite a bit to reach so-called herd immunity.
Medical experts have continuously noted what they're up against -- hesitancy, questions about access and concerns over the technology are among them.
"The reality is 90% of the country is now within five miles of a vaccine," says White House Senior COVID-19 Response Adviser Andy Slavitt.
"The mRNA technology that was used for the vaccine is not new, it's actually been around since the 1980s," says infectious disease specialist Dr. Ruth Adekunle.
Hesitancy about the pause on the Johnson & Johnson vaccine and questions about a lack of long-term data have also been prevalent.
"Some people have had this vaccine in their system now for nine months so we're getting a lot of information here, and it looks really safe," says National Institutes of Health Director Dr. Francis Collins.
People have also assumed they won't get COVID-19, or if they do, it won't be that bad. Dr. Anthony Fauci has a different perspective.
"If you get infected and you pass the virus on to someone else, you could be causing harm to someone else," says Fauci.
Experts say they've also heard specific concerns from minorities, conspiracy theories, religious hesitation and party line divides. But they say, whatever the reason, those who are hesitant must look to science.
"Hit the reset button, look at the evidence," says Collins.


More from News 12