Wooden Wonderland in Riverhead showcases handcrafted gifts by LI craftsmen

<p>Some of the finest craftsmen from around Long Island came together at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum &ndash; giving shoppers the opportunity to add some sentimental value to their holiday gifts.&nbsp;</p>

News 12 Staff

Dec 14, 2018, 7:50 PM

Updated 1,987 days ago

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Some of the finest craftsmen from around Long Island came together at the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum – giving shoppers the opportunity to add some sentimental value to their holiday gifts.
Organizers say the eighth annual Wooden Wonderland is held every year at the museum in Riverhead. It includes a variety of handcrafted holiday items, such as rustic Santas, unique ornaments and home decor pieces – all locally made.
Victoria Berger, the Suffolk County Historical Society Museum executive director, says the show also features  live woodworking as a way to show shoppers the amount of work that goes into a single piece.
"It was someone else's time that when into crafting that," she says. "It just makes things a little more special then something you could've bought at a department store."
Volunteer and craftsman Mark Vosburgh helped launch the event eight years ago as a way to showcase local wood carvers and workers. He says it's now grown into a full gallery, with about 30 vendors from across Long Island.
"You have carvers who work with power tools, you have carvers that work with knives, you have whittlers – and that's somebody who just works with one particular knife," he says. "We have people inside who can carve a Santa Claus that might be eight inches high, and they can do that very quickly in about 45 minutes."
Long Island residents also had the opportunity to view the museum for free while they browsed for unique gifts and support local artisans.
"I appreciate how much hard work and time goes into making something,” says Lynn Ann Kolesar, of Calverton. “People sometimes don't necessary understand the craftsmanship that goes into these things."
"I think that's what makes Christmas special, hanging something on your tree that you know someone made with some kind of story behind it," says Ashley Akl, of Smithtown.
Organizers say a portion of the proceeds go toward operational expenses for the 132-year-old museum. 


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