Doctor: Daylight Saving Time can trigger heart attacks to those at risk

NYU Langone Long Island Chief of Medicine Shaline Roa says everyone should get checked if they have symptoms or something doesn't feel right, especially during this time of year.

Joe Arena and Stephen Levine

Mar 11, 2023, 3:34 AM

Updated 460 days ago

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Medical experts are warning Long Islanders that Daylight Saving Time could take a toll on their health.
NYU Langone Long Island Chief of Medicine Shaline Roa says a change in timing can sometimes trigger a heart attack to those at risk.
Roa says a 2015 study proves that this time of year shows an increase in cardiac events.
"You actually can see up to a 24% increase in heart attacks and an 8% to 10% increase in strokes in the one to two weeks after a time change with the March time change being the most dominant factor," Roa says.
The doctor says everyone should get checked if they have symptoms or something doesn't feel right, especially during this time of year.
Roa says there is no perfect way to prepare for Daylight Saving Time, but there are some steps people can take.
"Probably two to three weeks prior to the time change, try to make sure you're consistently getting some sunlight in the daytime, helping yourself reorient, trying to have exposure in the morning," Roa says.


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