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Cuomo: Parts of Nassau, Suffolk at risk of becoming COVID-19 yellow zones

Parts of Nassau and Suffolk counties are now at risk of becoming yellow zones, which means those areas could be facing down new COVID-19 restrictions.

News 12 Staff

Nov 22, 2020, 10:36 PM

Updated 1,304 days ago

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Parts of Nassau and Suffolk counties are now at risk of becoming yellow zones, which means those areas could be facing down new COVID-19 restrictions.
Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Sunday multiple towns in both counties have COVID-19 rates that are on track to meet the state's criteria for yellow zone designation.
"Three levels of action, yellow zone, orange zone, red zone, going up with the infection rate," Cuomo said. He said restrictions will be placed on a community depending on which zone it falls into.
A yellow zone means the community has a 2.5% infection rate. The restrictions for those zones include houses of worship being limited to 50% capacity and gatherings being limited at 25 people. Businesses would still be open with indoor and outdoor dining being limited to four people per table and schools staying open with expanded testing.
In Nassau, Freeport, Massapequa Park and Massapequa have infection rates that are on track for the yellow zone.
In Suffolk, Cuomo said Brentwood, Bay Shore and Huntington Station are on their way to becoming yellow zones as well. Cuomo said these infection rates have to average out before qualifying for a certain zone.
"So it's a seven-day average, and then that number has to hold constant for 10 days," Cuomo explained.
Nassau County Executive Laura Curran said she's seeing COVID-19 rates go up in the same areas that Cuomo spoke about. She said she asked the state for help in keeping the infection rates down.
"I spoke with the state folks today and asked for increased funding for testing, for rapid testing in these places where we may go yellow," Curran said.
Cuomo said orange and red zones will lead to shutting down nonessential businesses, ending indoor and outdoor dining and restricting in-person learning in schools. He said rates possibly spiking over the holidays might push us over the edge.
Cuomo said indoor gatherings at private residences are still limited to 10 people.


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