MTA announces new bus lane camera enforcement on 14 NYC routes

The primary problem is cars parked in bus lanes, obstructing the flow of traffic and delaying buses. The MTA is addressing this with its automated camera enforcement system, which uses AI technology to go beyond just monitoring bus lanes.

Edric Robinson

Jun 17, 2024, 10:32 PM

Updated 27 days ago

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The Metropolitan Transportation Authority has announced an expansion of its bus lane camera enforcement program, aiming to improve bus service and reduce traffic violations across 14 bus routes in the city, including four routes in Manhattan.
“This is all about how do we improve the service that we give to our customers,” said Demetrius Crichlow, New York City Transit interim president.
The primary problem is cars parked in bus lanes, obstructing the flow of traffic and delaying buses. The MTA is addressing this with its automated camera enforcement system, which uses AI technology to go beyond just monitoring bus lanes.
“It also targets those outside of the bus lanes in certain locations, folks that are parked in our bus stops, folks that are stopped, parked illegally, double-parked in locations where bus routes is,” Crichlow explained.
According to the MTA, routes with this enforcement will see bus lane speeds increase by 5%, a 20% drop in collisions, and a reduction in emissions by up to 10%. This new system will help buses pull up to the curb more efficiently, making it easier for all passengers, including those with wheelchairs or strollers, to get on and off safely.
The new technology will be implemented on 14 bus routes across Brooklyn, Queens, the Bronx and Manhattan, affecting all 623 buses on these routes.
Department of Transportation Commissioner Ydanis Rodriguez highlighted the effectiveness of the program: “Only 19% of violators that receive an automated bus camera ticket have received a second one. Just 8% of violators have received 3 or more tickets so most people who drive they respect the law.”
The program is a collaborative effort between the city’s Department of Transportation and the Department of Finance. For the first 60 days, drivers will receive warnings instead of tickets. After this grace period, fines will be issued for any violations.
By the end of 2024, the MTA plans to have this new technology on over 1,000 buses across 33 routes.


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