Long Islanders taught about dangers of toxic pollutants in drinking water

The meeting, organized by the Citizens Campaign for the Environment, took place at the Hicksville Public Library Monday night and talked about 1,4 dioxane.

Jon Dowding

Apr 23, 2024, 2:39 AM

Updated 31 days ago

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Yale researchers spoke with Hicksville residents about a toxic pollutant found in the drinking water on the island and shared how Long Islanders could be the key to learning more about it.
The meeting, organized by the Citizens Campaign for the Environment, took place at the Hicksville Public Library Monday night and talked about 1,4 dioxane.
1,4 dioxane is found in common household products, but not much is known about how exactly it impacts the body.
Hicksville residents like Lillian Frawley asked researchers about the safety of the water and expressed concerns about how 1,4 dioxane could impact their health.
"How many years are you exposed to this carcinogen and then you wind up having a problem,” said Frawley.
More Long Islanders are needed for the study. Citizens Campaign for the Environment Executive Director Adrienne Esposito says they came to Hicksville for a specific reason.
"Areas around Hicksville, including Jericho and Woodbury, do have elevated levels of 1,4 dioxane in the drinking water,” she said.
Esposito says so far 300 people have signed up to participate.
"Yale will send a professional to your home, do an interview for about an hour, take a sample of your blood,” Esposito said. “It's all confidential.”
Roughly 200 more people are needed for the study.
“To get good science, we need good studies and we need public participation,” said Frawley.
Frawley has lived in Hicksville for almost three decades and came out to learn more about 1,4 dioxane. After learning about it and hearing about the study, she says she wants to participate.
"Yeah, come to my house. Take a sample of my water. Take blood samples. I want to know what's going on. I'd like to know more,” said Frawley.
She says she’s not just concerned about the water in Hicksville though.
"It's concerning especially with what's going on in Bethpage and the cancer rates here on Long Island,” she said. “It's very concerning and we need to know what's going on with the water."
Hicksville Water District officials addressed residents' concerns and told them about treatments done to destroy 1,4 dioxane in the water.
Those looking to participate in the Yale study can learn more here.
Learn more about 1,4 dioxane here


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