Farmingdale State star shines despite diabetes

Farmingdale State basketball player Nick Hurowitz is an all-conference player. He's also one of the Rams captain and 1,000 point scorer. He's earned those accolades while also being diabetic.

Kevin Maher

Feb 22, 2024, 12:32 PM

Updated 51 days ago

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Farmingdale State basketball player Nick Hurowitz is an all-conference player. He's also one of the Rams captain and 1,000 point scorer. He's earned those accolades while also being diabetic.
"I'm in full control of my body. I know what I need to do to get myself ready for a practice or a game or just life in general," said Hurowitz, who also starred at Mt. Sinai High School.
Nick was diagnosed with diabetes when he was 8 years old, after becoming ill during a CYO basketball game. But now, when he's on the court he knows all the warning signs for when blood sugar is not right.
"A lot of fatigue and dizziness. Sometimes the coaches have had to take me out of games due to it," he said.
Since Nick can't wear his insulin pump while he plays because it could break, he tries to control his blood sugar on game days by eating right and drinking a lot. He'll inject insulin before the game and at halftime if needed.
He also has technology helping him. Nick and the school's sports medicine department use an app that monitors Nick's blood sugar. The app gets real time data from a sensor Hurowtiz wears on his backside during games. Farmingdale State's director of sports medicine, Jennifer Bergstein monitors the app during the game and says the app is a life saver for Nick and her staff.
"Obviously when he's playing adrenaline will make his numbers spike. So, we just try to make sure he stays in a decent range so that he stays okay," said Bergstein.
"You're not thinking about it during the game. But at the same time, now there's someone thinking about it for you," said Hurowitz, who has led the Rams into their league semifinals this week.
Nick said some of his teammates don't even know he's diabetic. But Rams head coach Brendan Twomey knows and says it's amazing to watch Nick handle the disease and play at a high level. He also said Nick's taught him more about diabetes in the past four years than he knew al his life.
Thanks to the school's help, Nick can be the player the Rams look to for wins. And Nick hopes other diabetics will look at him as a role model.
"It gives them an opportunity to see that 'if he can do it, I can do it'," he said.


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