Doctors: Poor air quality still dangerous for vulnerable populations

Doctors: Poor air quality still dangerous for vulnerable populations

Doctors say that while the tri-state is heading in the right direction with air quality, smoke from the Canadian wildfires still remains dangerous for people with underlying health problems.
As of Saturday morning, the air quality index was 151.
"Really when we get to this level 151 or above, really that's when air pollution impacts everyone," says Patrick Campbell, the director of the Group Against Smog & Pollution.
Since Thursday morning, much of the tri-state area has been labeled in the orange or red range, causing the Centers for Disease Control to issue an air quality warning.
The unhealthy air can be a problem for people with respiratory or cardiovascular issues.
"Those with chronic respiratory conditions, those with asthma, COPD, people who are currently in a more compromised state of health, perhaps they have surgery or a heart attack, or they're battling the flu or pneumonia," says Jeffery Brook of the University of Toronto.
Doctors suggest people stay inside and workout indoors.
They recommend people check the air quality numbers each day before leaving home and wear a mask if they go outside.