Study: Black students more likely to be suspended at LI public schools

Posted: Updated:
WOODBURY -

A new study on Long Island school suspensions is reportedly showing a racial divide.

The study, called “Stolen Time” was published by research and advocacy group Education Trust-New York. It found that black students were penalized at rates that far outpaced their white peers, even though black students were no more disruptive than their white counterparts.

On Long Island, the report found that black students are 5.2 times more likely than white students to be suspended from public schools in Nassau County. Schools in Suffolk County were 4.7 times more likely to suspend black students than white students, the study found.

MORE: Long Island Education Coverage

At the elementary and middle school level, the report says Suffolk County suspends black girls 11.3 times more than white girls. In Nassau County, black female students were 8.2 times more likely to be suspended than white female students.

In both counties, black male high school students were suspended at a greater rate than any other group of students.

News 12 reached out to the New York state Department of Education about the report, but the calls were not returned. 

MORE: Read more on this story at Newsday.com

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