Environmentalists wary of plan to build storm gates around NYC, LI

Posted: Updated:
KINGS POINT -

Environmentalists are urging the Army Corps of Engineers to reject a plan meant to protect New York from a major hurricane.

The Army Corps of Engineers is studying six options to protect New York and New Jersey's harbors and tributaries.

One option is to build giant storm gates and storm surge barriers around New York and Long Island.

Environmentalists fear the man-made barriers could deflect storm surges toward Long Island and increase coastal flooding.

"This to me is our modern day 'Watergate,' says Adrienne Esposito, of Citizens Campaign for the Environment. "They want to put up these water gates to protect the city but Long Island could indeed suffer severely for it."

Evironmentalists also are concerned that sea barriers would slowly cut off nutrients from New York Harbor and prevent contaminants from washing into the ocean.

At a public meeting Tuesday in Kings Point, the Army Corps tried to reassure Long Island residents.

"If there are indications that there will be those types of impacts, those alternatives will only go forward if we fully address those induced flooding impacts," says Bryce Wisemuller, of the Army Corps of Engineers.

A final plan is not expected to be released until 2021.

sorry to interrupt
your first 20 are free
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Spectrum Networks® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please enjoy 20 complimentary views of articles, photos, and videos during the next 30 days.
you have reached your 20 view limit
Access to News 12 is free for Optimum, Comcast®, Spectrum Networks® and Service ElectricSM customers.
Please login or create an account to continue enjoying News12.
Our sign-up page is undergoing maintenance and is not currently available. However, you will be given direct access to news12.com while we complete our upgrade.
When we are back up and running you will be prompted at that time to complete your sign in. Until then, enjoy the local news, weather, traffic and more that's "as local as local news gets."