Bethpage Water District to close wells in plume site

Posted: Updated:
BETHPAGE -

Over the course of the next 10 years, the Bethpage Water District plans to close three wells located within the Grumman toxic plume site and replace them with new wells outside of the contaminated area. 

Water District Superintendent Michael Boufis insists the current drinking water is safe thanks to treatment plants – but filtration process costs have become “astronomical.”

“We're looking to develop sites outside of the plume area and lessen our costs,” said Boufis.

MORE: Water Quality on Long Island 

Neighboring water districts worry that if Bethpage is no longer reliant on treated drinking water in the contaminated area, the burden could soon fall to them.

"It’s concerning that Bethpage is shutting them off. I don’t blame them. I think this hopefully will step up the process for the DEC, Navy and Grumman to do something," said Massapequa Water District Superintendent Stan Carey.

Some parents in Bethpage told News 12 that they are relieved that the water district is looking at new options.

Boufis said the entire process could take five to eight years.

Officials have said that the plume is the result of toxic dumping that took place on the former Grumman site as military production ramped up during World War II.

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