Humpback whale found dead on Atlantic Beach

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ATLANTIC BEACH -

A humpback whale was found dead on East Atlantic Beach Tuesday morning. 

The whale was discovered around 8 a.m. at the shore off Buffalo Avenue. Marine biologists estimate it's about 30 feet long.

For now, state Environmental Conservation police are guarding the whale. On Wednesday, the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society will start the process of removing the whale. 

Robert DiGiovanni, the chief scientist with the Atlantic Marine Conservation Society, says a necropsy will be performed to determine the cause of death. He says this is the 14th large whale to be found dead in New York waters this year.

"We have an unusual mortality event going on right now in the western Atlantic for humpback whales and white whales," says DiGiovanni. "There's a much larger investigation going on."

Workers with the AMCS plan to arrive at the beach at 8 a.m. Wednesday to remove the whale, which will then be taken to a secured location. 

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