Study: 9/11 responders more likely to get cancer

A new report shows that a staggering number of NYPD officers have been diagnosed with cancer since the Sept. 11, 2001 terror attacks.



Researchers say that after reviewing the records of 40,000 NYPD officers, those who were present at Ground Zero are 50 percent more likely to develop cancer.



The study was conducted by the NYPD and medical centers at Cornell College and Columbia University.



Researchers say there were large increases in four rare cancers -- brain, kidney, thyroid and lymphoma. The rates of those either doubled or tripled for Sept. 11 responders.



This comes shortly after the Zadroga Act, a federal law to ensure that Sept. 11 responders received the medical care that they needed, expired on Oct. 1.


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