WOODBURY - The latest polls show some movement in support for the 2016 presidential candidates, as the Republican candidates jockey for the spotlight and Democratic front-runner Hillary Clinton continues to bat off questions about her email server.

A new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll of Democratic voters shows Clinton still in the lead with 42 percent, but that's just 7 percentage points more than self-described Democratic socialist Bernie Sanders. Back in July, Clinton had a 34-point lead over the Vermont senator in the same poll.

The poll also shows Joe Biden with 17 percent of support, although he has not officially announced his candidacy.

Clinton appeared on NBC's "Meet the Press" Sunday morning and once again defended her use of a personal email server while she was secretary of state. "What I have tried to do is provide more transparency and more information than anybody I'm aware of who's ever served in the government," she said.

She also likened the controversy to those that followed her and her husband during his time in the White House. "During the '90s, I was subjected to the same kind of barrage. And it was, it seemed to be at the time, endless," she said. "When I ran for the Senate, people said, 'Hey, we are more concerned about what you're going to do for us.' And I trust the voters to make that decision this time around too."

On the Republican side of the race, Donald Trump has topped poll after poll for weeks, but the latest numbers show another political outsider closing in. A new NBC/Wall Street Journal poll of Republican voters shows retired neurosurgeon Ben Carson with 20 percent of support, just 1 point behind Trump.

The poll had Florida Sen. Marco Rubio tied with former Hewlett Packard CEO Carly Fiorina for third place, each with 11 percent of support. Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush rounded out the top five with 7 percent.

Another GOP candidate who received a bit of a boost this weekend was Sen. Ted Cruz. For the third straight year, the Texas Republican won a straw poll at the Values Voter Summit. A total of 2,700 religous conservatives were registered for that event.