MINEOLA - Geraldine Ferraro, the first woman to run for U.S. vice president on a major party ticket, has died today at age 75.

A former New York congresswoman and Queens prosecutor, Ferraro is being remembered as a trailblazer for women in public office.

Ferraro made history in 1984 when she accepted the Democratic nomination for vice president, becoming the running mate of Walter Mondale.

"I said, 'my gosh, we actually maybe have a woman vice president,' which back then that was groundbreaking," says Rep. Carolyn McCarthy (D-Mineola).

Ferraro became McCarthy's mentor when she first ran for the U.S. Congress in 1996, inspiring her to reach out to her constituents and help other women along the way.

Hopes for the Mondale-Ferraro ticket were eventually buried when Ronald Reagan won in a landslide. After losing in 1984, Ferraro made an unsuccessful bid for the U.S. Senate, became ambassador to the U.N.'s Human Rights Commission and co-hosted CNN's "Crossfire."

In 2001, Ferraro announced she had been diagnosed with blood cancer, but despite that, friends say she never slowed down.