The Next Big One: Vulnerable coastline

Fire Island has been eroding steadily over the years, despite occasional beach replenishment projects. (1/29/13)

LINDENHURST - Thousands of Long Islanders live on or near the water and while residents enjoy breathtaking views, they also risk devastating damage when facing a severe storm.

Hurricane Sandy left many wondering how we can properly protect these vulnerable coastline communities from future storms.

Fire Island is a natural line of defense against storms and heavy flooding. Some experts warn that if the ocean cuts through in a major breach, thousands of homes on the mainland shore could get socked with flooding even worse than Sandy.  

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Fire Island has also been eroding steadily over the years, despite occasional beach replenishment projects.

Former developer Murray Barbash says now is the time to shore up Fire Island, before the next big one.  

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