Life After Sandy: 2 families, 2 outcomes

Two families devastated by Superstorm Sandy have had different experiences with regard to their road to recovery.

Two families devastated by Superstorm Sandy have had different experiences with regard to their road to recovery. (10/29/15)

OCEANSIDE - Two families devastated by Superstorm Sandy have had different experiences with regard to their road to recovery.

Judy and David Lande raised their two children in their Oceanside home and made more than two decades worth of memories there. After Sandy left 3 feet of raw sewage and mud in their basement, the couple says they have no intentions of returning to their home.

"FEMA through flood insurance…gave us enough money to clean out our basement. It took about a month and cost somewhere around $75,000- $80,000. New York Rising says because we got that money, we're not entitled to any other money," David Lande tells News 12.

As the paperwork for the house piled up, he says the money ran out.

"We eventually made the decision that we weren't going to fix the house. We didn't have the money to fix it," says Lande.

David Lande says the bank did sue for foreclosure, but he has not heard from them in a year. He says the situation has turned from sadness and frustration, to eventual acceptance. The Lande family is currently living in a one-bedroom, one-bathroom apartment.

The Rector family, however, says they are 99.9 percent finished with repairing their Long Beach home from the effects of Sandy.

Anthony and Jill Rector paid tens of thousands of dollars out of pocket in repairs to their home after floodwaters destroyed much of their property. Anthony Rector says FEMA brought up an issue that had the family thinking they had to move.

"We had a small crawl space that was technically below grade - which FEMA classifies as a basement,” he tells News 12. “So even though it was only 3 feet tall, it was considered a basement and our flood insurance went from $600 to $6,000 overnight and that was a backbreaker."

At the same time, he says New York Rising agreed to pay 80 percent of the cost to raise their home. The home raising made it FEMA-compliant, which brought their flood insurance back down.

"It was frustrating at times dealing with different case workers and people were constantly changing and we were getting different answers,” says Anthony Rector.

 

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